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Outcomes of Hip Arthroscopy in Competitive Athletes

Source: Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 

Patient-reported outcomes and VAS in athletes significantly improved at a minimum of 2 years after capsular plication as a part of hip arthroscopy addressing varying pathologies. In addition, most patients returned to sports at similar or higher competitive levels. These results suggest that capsular plication is a favorable treatment option in athletes with ligamentous laxity and/or borderline dysplasia.

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AAOS releases new clinical practice guideline for osteoarthritis of the hip

Source: Medical Xpress

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) recently released a new clinical practice guideline (CPG) on the treatment of osteoarthritis of the hip that strongly recommends the use of pre-surgical treatments to ease pain and improve mobility, including corticosteroid injections, physical therapy and non-narcotic medications.

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Dry needling offers alternative to cortisone injection for hip pain

Source: Medical Xpress

Dry needling may be a viable treatment alternative to cortisone injection for patients with chronic, intermittent pain and tenderness on the outside of the hip, thus avoiding the potentially harmful effects of steroids, according to a new study published in the April 2017 issue of the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy (JOSPT).

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Towards better hip replacements

Source: Healio

Patients with degenerative arthritis who underwent total hip or knee arthroplasty experienced better survival compared with the general population for about 8 years after surgery, according to results.

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Sooner on your feet after hip fracture

Source: Medical News Today

An already available drug can help patients get back on their feet more rapidly after a hip fracture, according to an international study published in the Journal of Bone Joint Surgery. The results suggest that treatment with the drug accelerates the healing process in broken bones.

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Patient factors, not procedure, linked with major complications after surgery for femoral neck fracture

Source: Healio

The risk of major postoperative complications after hemiarthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty for treatment of femoral neck fractures is influenced by patient factors, rather than choice of procedure, according to study results.

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Towards better hip replacements

Source: Healio

Patients with degenerative arthritis who underwent total hip or knee arthroplasty experienced better survival compared with the general population for about 8 years after surgery, according to results.

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Sooner on your feet after hip fracture

Source: Medical News Today

An already available drug can help patients get back on their feet more rapidly after a hip fracture, according to an international study published in the Journal of Bone Joint Surgery. The results suggest that treatment with the drug accelerates the healing process in broken bones.

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Hip fracture patients fare best during recovery in high-occupancy nursing homes with higher level physician staffing

Source: Medical Xpress

A new study from Penn Medicine, which compared outcome variations in acute and post-acute care facilities, suggests that for older adults hospitalized with hip fracture, the quality of the post-acute care they receive has a greater impact on long-term recovery than the care they received at the hospital.

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New microprocessor technology could improve gait in prosthesis users

Source: Healio

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. — A speaker here at the New Jersey Chapter of the American Academy of Orthotists and Prosthetists Annual Meeting presented a novel prosthesis that could increase balance and stability, while normalizing gait characteristics for transtibital and transfemoral users.

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Ask Well: Running After Hip Replacement

Source: The New York Times

Is it healthy for older people who have hip replacements to take up running or jogging?

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Heavier patients require less blood transfusions in hip, knee replacement surgery

Source: Medical Xpress

Blood transfusion rates in hip and knee replacement surgery were dramatically lower in overweight or obese patients than patients of normal weight, according to a study at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.

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Are Ceramic-on-Poly Implants a Cost-Effective Alternative for THA?

Source: ICJR

A Markhov decision model showed that even if ceramic-on-polyethylene implants were more expensive than metal-on-polyethylene implants, lower revision rates could make the ceramic-on-poly option more cost-effective in certain patients.

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Use of Topical Tranexamic Acid in Primary THA

Source: ICJR

Which total hip arthroplasty patients benefit most from TXA administration? A study from Brown University looked at gender, age, BMI, preoperative hemoglobin, and surgical approach to find out.

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Complication rates for nonagenarian patients similar to those of younger patients undergoing total hip replacement surgery

Source: Medical News Today

As more Americans are living well into their 90s, the number of nonagenarian total hip replacement (THR) candidates continues to increase.

The authors of the study concluded that nonagenarian patients can safely undergo a THR, despite advanced age and a higher prevalence of comorbidities. Overall, the nonagenarian patients experienced a complication rate comparable to those of younger THR patients, and the higher mortality rate is well within expectations for individuals age 90 and older.

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Magnesium may protect against hip fractures

Source: Science Daily

Drinking water with a relatively high concentration of magnesium protects against hip fractures, according to results of a new study. The researchers studied variations in magnesium and calcium levels in drinking water between different areas, as these are assumed to have a role in the development of bone strength. They wanted to examine whether there was a correlation between magnesium and calcium concentrations in drinking water and the incidence of hip fracture. The study results show that magnesium protects against hip fracture for both men and women. The researchers found no independent protective effect of calcium.

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Genetics may explain high-functioning senior athletes with hip abnormalities

Source: Science Daily

Genetics may explain why some senior athletes are high functioning despite having one or both hip abnormalities typically associated with early onset osteoarthritis: developmental dislocation of the hip (dysplasia), a loose hip joint; or femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), a condition in which the hip bones are abnormally shaped.

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Study shows direct correlation between linear wear of hip implants and patient activity

Source: Healio.com

German and American researchers have conducted one of the first studies indicating a direct link between patient activity and the rate of linear wear in total hip replacements using alumina heads and conventional polyethylene.

Using univariate regression analysis, Finn and colleagues were able to assess weight, age at surgery, peak activity, medium intensity steps, high intensity steps, inclination angle and acetabular anteversion, according to the abstract. Age, weight, gender and cup position were not associated with the linear wear rate.

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Urine test can indicate a woman's risk of bone fracture, Pitt study finds

Source: Medical News Today

A simple urine test can indicate a premenopausal woman's risk of suffering bone fractures as she ages, according to new research led by University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health (GSPH) epidemiologists.

"Bone fractures - particularly in the hip, wrist and back - have serious consequences, including disability and death," said Jane Cauley, Dr.P.H., professor of epidemiology, GSPH, and lead author of the study. "Knowing a woman's risk of fracture can help doctors determine the best course of action to protect her bones as she enters menopause, a time when estrogen deficiency negatively affects skeletal health."

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Minor exercise can protect premenopausal women's bones

Source: Medical News Today

According to new research, premenopausal women who engage in physical activity can significantly reduce a known inhibitor of bone formation called sclerostin.

The study, which will be published in the October issue of Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (JCEM), also found that physical activity improved IGF-1 levels, which have a positive impact on bone formation.

"Physical activity training is conceptually simple, inexpensive, and can serve practical purposes including reducing the risk of low bone mass, osteoporosis, and consequently fractures. Our study found that even minor changes in physical activity were associated with clear effects on serum levels of sclerostin, IGF-1 and bone turnover markers."

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Tough gel stretches to 21 times its length, recoils, and heals itself - may pave the way to replacing damaged cartilage in human joints

Source: Medical News Today

A team of experts in mechanics, materials science, and tissue engineering at Harvard have created an extremely stretchy and tough gel that may pave the way to replacing damaged cartilage in human joints.

"Conventional hydrogels are very weak and brittle - imagine a spoon breaking through jelly," explains lead author Jeong-Yun Sun, a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS). "But because they are water-based and biocompatible, people would like to use them for some very challenging applications like artificial cartilage or spinal disks. For a gel to work in those settings, it has to be able to stretch and expand under compression and tension without breaking."

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Pioneering plan for stem cell hip replacements

Source: Herald Scotland

SCOTS researchers have revealed plans to create a revolutionary new hip implant that will use the latest stem cell technology to allow patients to grow their own bone, removing the need for regular replacement surgery.

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Direct anterior approach to THA yields good results, depends upon surgeon experience

Source: Healio.com

The use of the direct anterior approach in total hip arthroplasty can yield good results backed by numerous studies but depends upon proper education, according to one surgeon’s experience.

J. Bohannon Mason, MD, shared his findings at the International Congress for Joint Reconstruction San Diego 2012 meeting, which was held in collaboration with Orthopedics Today.

“The best approach? They all have advantages and disadvantages,” he said. “When you look at [DA], it does require special instrumentation and I would say it does require special training – however, you have quick recovery, stability and proper cup positioning.”

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Tart cherries may help millions reduce inflammation to manage pain, according to new research

Source: Medical News Today

Tart cherries may help reduce chronic inflammation, especially for the millions of Americans suffering from debilitating joint pain and arthritis, according to new research from Oregon Health & Science University presented at the American College of Sports Medicine Conference (ACSM) in San Francisco, Calif.1 In fact, the researchers suggest tart cherries have the "highest anti-inflammatory content of any food" and can help people with osteoarthritis manage their disease.

Along with providing the fruit's bright red color, the antioxidant compounds in tart cherries - called anthocyanins - have been specifically linked to high antioxidant capacity and reduced inflammation, at levels comparable to some well-known pain medications.

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Autograft hip reconstruction provides good outcomes for athletes

Source: Medical News Today

A common, painful hip condition in elite athletes may be able to be repaired with an improved surgical technique, according to researchers presenting their work at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Annual Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland.

"In our review of 21 male, elite athletes who had hip pain and instability issues (hypoplastic or labrum tear), 81 percent returned to play at a similar level as before they were hurt, after receiving an arthroscopic reconstruction technique using an ipsilateral iliotibial band autograft," said research author, Marc J. Philippon, MD, of the Steadman Philippon Research Institute in Vail, Colorado.

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Mobile compression device superior to warfarin in preventing major bleeding events after THA, TKA

SourceHealio.com

A mobile compression device is similarly effective to warfarin in the prevention of venous thrombembolic events following total hip or knee arthroplasty — but significantly better in preventing major bleeding events, according to researchers from St. Louis.

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Smoking linked to worse outcomes in joint replacement

SourceArthritis Today

Two studies presented at the 2012 annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeon highlight the dangers that smoking poses to patients receiving total knee or hip implants.

The researchers found that the overall revision rate – meaning the number of surgeries that had to be redone – was 10 times higher for smokers compared with nonsmokers: 10 percent vs. 1 percent. Smokers also had a significantly higher rate of complications compared with non-smokers (21 percent vs. 12 percent), including blood clots, abnormal heartbeat, irregular heartbeat, urinary tract infection and kidney failure.

Quitting’s not easy, but it’s worth it, says Dr. Lombardi. “The effect of nicotine may persist, but obviously it will [lessen] if you stop.”

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Can oral bacteria cause a joint replacement to fail?

SourceHealth Point Capital

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University may have found a potential link between gum disease and joint health, with particular implications for failing joint replacements. Working collaboratively, dental, orthopedic and arthritis specialists tested the DNA in synovial fluid in 36 patients with both native and replacement joints. Some samples showed the presence of oral bacteria in the fluid, which the scientists suggest could be contributing to aseptic loosening or excessive wear in joint replacement patients when no infection is present.

Though the results were modest, the study's authors say that this confirms a pathway for oral bacteria between the mouth and joints. This adds to the body of literature showing the relationship between dental disease and other conditions, including heart disease and stroke. Further, they recommend that patients with arthritis or failed prosthetic joints be examined for the presence of periodontal diseases and be treated accordingly and suggest that appropriate treatment of periodontal disease may help prevent joint replacements. The study was published in the Journal of Clinical Rheumatology.

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Arthritis anxiety

SourceDaily Rx Relevant Health News

The researchers believe that anxiety is a commonly overlooked side effect of arthritis, and that health care providers should recommend mental health screenings for all who are diagnosed.

The study was published online April 30th, 2012, in the journal Arthritis Care & Research and was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Study: Crosslinked polyethylene may last a lifetime in patients older than 50 years

SourceHealio.com

The results of an award-winning study indicate a low risk of wear-through and clinically significant osteolysis during the lives of patients older than 50 years who undergo total hip arthroplasty with crosslinked polyethylene bearings.

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Indications and techniques for hip arthroscopy continue to evolve

SourceHealio.com

"Hip arthroscopy is an evolving science," Charles A. Bush-Joseph, MD, of Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush in Chicago, told Orthopedics Today. "We are clearly better able to more accurately diagnose hip and groin conditions. Industry is catching up. There has been dramatic innovation in the equipment surgeons use to perform these types of procedures, making them more reliable and reproducible."

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High impact sports reduce durability of hip implants

SourceHealio.com

French researchers have confirmed that high-impact sport, such as jogging or soccer, increases the risk of total hip arthroplasty mechanical failure, according to a study published in Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research.

“Since participation in sport is now a reality for a significant number of total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients, surgeons may need to adapt their choices of bearing surfaces in implants to accommodate this growing trend,” the authors wrote.

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Untreated varicose veins put patients at greater DVT risk following THA

SourceOrthosupersite

As the search continues for methods to reduce deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism risk in patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty, researchers have found increased rates of deep vein thrombosis within 90 days of undergoing total hip arthroplasty among patients with untreated varicose veins.

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Hip resurfacing: The metal-on-metal bearing material is not the problem

SourceOrthosupersite

The success of total hip replacement (THR) in the 20th century has been tremendous with improvements in the durability of new designs, bearing materials and fixation techniques. However, the young and active patients have historically had high revision rates compared with older, more sedentary patients, notably when the etiology of the disease is osteonecrosis. Despite great improvements in cementless stem fixation, hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) has the advantages of replicating leg length and offset, and maintaining proximal bone unlike THR. Moreover, dislocation in THR remains a problem when small femoral heads are used. Resurfacing patients also do not report thigh pain as it sometimes happens after THR.

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ACR approves standardized measures to determine RA disease activity

SourceOrthosupersite

A working group organized by the American College of Rheumatology has analyzed more than 60 disease activity measures for rheumatoid arthritis and recommended six measures that can be applied in clinical practice, according to a press release. The analysis by the Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Clinical Disease Activity Measures Working Group apppear in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Understanding a patient's mental health status before hip replacement surgery may improve education and care

SourceMedical News Today

Patients taking antidepressants up to three years prior to undergoing a total hip replacement (THR) were more likely to report greater pain before and after surgery and less satisfaction with their procedure, according to new research presented at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS).

According to the investigators, a patient's mental health status should be assessed prior to surgery and taken into consideration during post-operative care.

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Follow-up online support after joint replacement surgery benefits patients

SourceMedical News Today

Patients who have had total joint replacement (TJR) are expected to return to their physician's office or clinic regularly for routine follow-up care.

Web-based follow-up can provide significant time and cost savings to TKR patients without complications, and make the physician's office more accessible to new patients, patients awaiting surgery, and/or patients with post-surgical complications.

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Return to running possible after hip resurfacing

SourceMedlineplus

Recreational runners who undergo hip resurfacing, an alternative to a total hip replacement, may be able to return to the sport after surgery, according to a recent study from France. Still, hip resurfacing represents an attractive choice for active individuals. A hip resurfacing implant is easier to revise or repair than a total hip replacement, researchers said.

It also feels more natural than a traditional total hip replacement, according to Anderson, in part because less bone is removed from the head of the femur in hip resurfacing. "The body has a more normal awareness of that hip, which makes the joint feel more secure in sports with a lot of running, cutting and twisting," Anderson told Reuters Health.

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Patients in walking rehabilitation program improve function after THA

Source - ORTHOSuperSite

A Norweigan walking skills training program has significantly increased physical performance in patients undergoing rehabilitation after total hip arthroplasty, according to a study published in Arthritis Care & Research.

"The training program was well tolerated by patients and no complications were report[ed]. Our findings suggest physical rehabilitation helps improve mobility and function in patients who received hip replacements," Kristi E. Heiberg, RPT, MSc, stated in the release.

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Treating cam-type hip impingement yields improved hip scores at early follow-up

Source - ORTHOSuperSite

Arthroscopic osteoplasty to manage cam-type femoral acetabular impingement was found to improve hip function at early follow-up in a study presented by a British investigator at the Current Concepts in Joint Replacement 2011 Winter Meeting, here.

However, the relative contributions of cam impingement correction and labral/chondral hip surgery remain unclear, according to Fares S. Haddad, McH(Orth), FRCS, an Orthopaedics Today Europe Editorial Board member.

"We have an improved understanding of the influence of hip anatomy and mechanics on hip symptoms and disease. Our tools for dealing with hip pathology are also evolving dramatically," Haddad said during his presentation.

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Low revision rates associated with tapered rectangular hip stem

Source - ORTHOSuperSite

Femoral fixation of a cementless total hip arthroplasty using a tapered, rectangular stem made of titanium-aluminum-niobium alloy continues to be secure at 20-years follow-up, according to a recently presented study.

"The most important result of study is the low rate of revisions of the femoral component, with 97% survivorship," Alexander Kolb, MD, said during his presentation at the 12th EFORT Congress 2011. "The low rate of femoral osteolysis in the medial and distal Gruen zones proves the stability of the osseous integration of the stems at follow up."

Kolb, of the department of orthopedics and orthopedic surgery at Medical University of Vienna, and colleagues evaluated the stability of the Zweymüller (Zimmer) stem for cementless total hip arthroplasty.

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Osteonecrosis not a predictor of THA revision

FRIDAY, October 28, 2011 — Osteonecrosis is not a predictor of poor outcomes in primary total hip arthroplasty, even when associated with other common risk factors, and total hip arthroplasty revision rates have improved since 1990, according to a study presented by Henning R. Johansson at the SICOT XXV Triennial World Congress 2011.

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Patients return to work after total hip arthroplasty with preoperative function

FRIDAY, October 28, 2011 — The majority of working-age patients can return to their jobs after total hip replacement procedures and perform their jobs at preoperative levels, according to a presenter at the SICOT XXV Triennial World Congress 2011.

Turnbull said that age and body mass index were significantly related to recovery time and return to work, while gender was not a factor. Less than half the patients could return to light exercise. No significant correlation was found between patients who reported a restriction at work and postoperative pain scores, SF12 scores, or Oxford hip scores, the authors wrote.

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Modified straight stem's curvature allows implantation in narrow femoral cavitiesF

THURSDAY, October 27, 2011 — Researchers reported successful outcomes using a modified straight cementless hip stem with proximal-medial curvature for proximal fixation in total hip arthroplasty, according to a study presented at the SICOT XXV Triennial World Congress 2011.

"Most studies … say narrow femoral bone conditions can be challenging," Steffen Kohler, said. "The small shape of stem designs may change outcomes dramatically."

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Link between Cam-Type Deformities and MRI Detected Hip Damage in Asymptomatic Young Men, Potential Progression to Osteoarthritis of the Hip

Hip impingement (femoracetabular impingement) may be a risk factor of osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. A new study reveals that the presence of an underlying deformity, known as cam impingement, is associated with hip damage in young men without any arthritis symptoms and detected using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Full findings are now published in Arthritis & Rheumatism, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR).

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Potential to Diagnose, Prevent Osteoarthritis

A new method is set to help doctors diagnose osteoarthritis at such an early stage that it will be possible to delay the progression of the disease by many years, or maybe even stop it entirely.

One of the problems with osteoarthritis has been diagnosing and monitoring the disease before symptoms become evident. It has therefore been difficult to change or delay the course of the disease. A few years ago, researchers from Lund University and Harvard Medical School developed a method to measure the degree of osteoarthritis using an MRI scanner, even at a very early stage. The method is called dGEMRIC (delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage).

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Reducing Blood Clots after Hip and Knee Replacement: New Clinical Treatment Guideline Outlines Recommendations

An updated clinical practice guideline released by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) Board of Directors recommends how to reduce the likelihood of blood clots after hip or knee replacement surgery, procedures that more than 800,000 Americans undergo each year. The new guideline suggests use of preventive treatments and advises against routinely screening patients after surgery using ultrasound imaging.

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Potential Progression to Osteoarthritis of the Hip

SATURDAY 10 September, 2011 — Hip impingement (femoracetabular impingement) may be a risk factor of osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. A new study reveals that the presence of an underlying deformity, known as cam impingement, is associated with hip damage in young men without any arthritis symptoms and detected using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Full findings are now published in Arthritis & Rheumatism, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR).

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FDA Approves XARELTO® (rivaroxaban Tablets) to Help Prevent Deep Vein Thrombosis in Patients Undergoing Knee or Hip Replacement Surgery

SATURDAY 02 July, 2011 — Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved XARELTO® (rivaroxaban tablets), a novel, once-daily, oral anticoagulant for the prevention (prophylaxis) of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) which may lead to a pulmonary embolism (PE) in people undergoing knee or hip replacement surgery.

"The use of blood thinners has been shown to safely and effectively help keep people from developing preventable blood clots," said Alan Brownstein, Chief Executive Officer of the National Blood Clot Alliance. "The FDA approval of a new blood thinner, XARELTO®, offers a new option for patients seeking knee or hip replacement surgery, and we encourage people to discuss with their physicians the risk of blood clots and which blood thinner offers optimal protection as part of their pre-surgical consultation."

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Hip strengthening program improved single leg squatting mechanics

WEDNESDAY 10 August, 2011 – A strengthening and movement program that targeted the hip abductors and hip external rotators did not alter abnormal running mechanics, according to results of a block randomized controlled trial.

"Abnormal movement patterns during running and single leg squatting have been associated with a number of running related injuries in females," the authors wrote. Typically, hip strengthening is used to correct these aberrant movements. While strengthening improves symptoms, it is unclear if the underlying mechanics during functional movements are changed.

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Adolescent participation in high-intensity sports linked to high osteoarthritis rates

TUESDAY 26 July, 2011 – Participation in vigorous sporting activities during childhood and adolescence can cause abnormal development of the femur in young athletes and may lead to hip deformation, such as reduced rotation and pain during movement, according to Swiss researchers.

The findings, published online in Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, may explain why athletes are at higher risk than more sedentary individuals to develop osteoarthritis.

"Our data suggest that this hip deformity is in part a developmental deformity, and its expression in young adulthood may be triggered by environmental factors such as high-level sports activity during childhood and around the time of closure of the femoral growth plate," the Klaus A. Seibenrock, MD, and his fellow authors wrote.

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MRI Techniques Can Detect Early Osteoarthritis

TUESDAY 16 August, 2011 – Researchers from NYU Langone Medical Center's Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery and Radiology found that advanced MRI techniques can be used to detect subtle changes in joint cartilage microstructure and provide physicians a diagnostic tool for finding key markers of early osteoarthritis (OA). By using these techniques during patient exams to identify OA earlier, clinicians can shift the management of the disease from eventual joint reconstruction to long-term preservation. The study was published in the July issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

"Imaging technology is now sensitive and powerful enough to enable detection of subtle changes in the intricate balance of water, chondrocytes and the collagen fibers and protein molecules that make up our joint cartilage which we now know can point to future osteoarthritis," says Laith Jazrawi, MD, associate professor of orthopaedic surgery and lead author of the paper.

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Future of replacement may include more resurfacing, percutaneous fixation

August 2011 – As we enter our sixth decade of total hip replacement and our fifth decade of total knee replacement, the orthopedic community can take pride in the substantial improvements that have been made in these operations which produce validated improvements in patients' lives. The incidence of two of the most feared complications of joint replacement, infection and thromboembolic disease, has been substantially reduced. In addition, the incidence of instability in total hip replacement has decreased significantly, and the length of hospital stays has decreased remarkably for hip and knee replacement. Despite these improvements, there is a real interest by patients for "less invasive, faster recovery" surgery modifications.

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North Cypress Medical Center Signs Contract with Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas

Cypress, TX, 4/6/11- Dr. Robert A. Behar, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of North Cypress Medical Center, announced today that North Cypress Medical Center will become an in-network facility provider for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas (BCBSTX) for the PPO, HMO & Traditional Products, effective June 1, 2011.

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Advanced Orthopaedics & Spine Medicine to Host Clinical Trial of FDA Approved Personalized Knee Implant

Dr. David Mack of Advanced Orthopaedics & Spine Medicine and North Cypress Medical Center is participating in a ten year follow-up trial of the ConforMIS iUni® G2 knee resurfacing device, an FDA cleared implant for patients with osteoarthritic damage in a single compartment of the knee. Unlike traditional total knee replacement which replaces the entire joint, the ConforMIS partial knee resurfacing device allows for the targeted and minimally invasive treatment of just the diseased area of the knee in properly indicated patients.

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Anterior Hip Replacement at North Cypress Medical Center

North Cypress Medical Center is offering hip replacement surgery with great success.

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New Surgery Available at North Cypress

More than 192,000 total hip replacements are performed each year in the United States. Typically, a patient is told to limit mobility for 6-8 weeks following traditional surgery. Using the new Anterior Hip Replacement Approach, patients can be up and walking after only one week.

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First Enrollment Cormet Post Approval Study

Dr. Stefan Kreuzer located in Houston Texas, one of the four selected surgeons for the Cormet Post Approval study, implanted the first study patient on April 21, 2008.

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Anterior Approach Hip Replacement Surgery

Though uncommonly used in the United States, the anterior approach for total hip replacement provides definite advantages for patients, even those in need of bilateral procedures. Rehabilitation is simplified and accelerated, dislocation risk is reduced, leg length is more accurately controlled, and the incision is small.

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